Pyotr ilyich tchaikovsky tschaikowsky - radio-sinfonie-orchester frankfurt - sinfonische werke fatum


Theories that Tchaikovsky's death was a suicide soon began to surface. Postulations ranged from reckless action on the composer's part to orders from Tsar Alexander III of Russia , with the reporters ranging from Tchaikovsky's family members to composer Alexander Glazunov . Since 1979, one variation of the theory has gained some ground—a sentence of suicide imposed in a "court of honor" by Tchaikovsky's fellow alumni of the Imperial School of Jurisprudence , as a censure of the composer's homosexuality . Nonetheless, the cause of Tchaikovsky's death remains highly contested, though it may never actually be solved.

Although musically precocious, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant. There was scant opportunity for a musical career in Russia at that time and no system of public music education. When an opportunity for such an education arose, he entered the nascent Saint Petersburg Conservatory, from which he graduated in 1865. The formal Western-oriented teaching he received there set him apart from composers of the contemporary nationalist movement embodied by the Russian composers of The Five, with whom his professional relationship was mixed. Tchaikovsky's training set him on a path to reconcile what he had learned with the native musical practices to which he had been exposed from childhood. From this reconciliation he forged a personal but unmistakably Russian style—a task that did not prove easy. The principles that governed melody, harmony and other fundamentals of Russian music ran completely counter to those that governed Western European music; this seemed to defeat the potential for using Russian music in large-scale Western composition or for forming a composite style, and it caused personal antipathies that dented Tchaikovsky's self-confidence. Russian culture exhibited a split personality, with its native and adopted elements having drifted apart increasingly since the time of Peter the Great. This resulted in uncertainty among the intelligentsia about the country's national...

In 1848 the family moved to St. Petersburg. Tchaikovsky was unhappy and unsettled as he was often separated from his family who moved several times. In 1854 his mother died. He tried to comfort himself by playing music. He spent nine years at the School of Jurisprudence. When he left school, he had to get a job. For four years he worked as a clerk in the Ministry of Justice . Then the composer and pianist Anton Rubinstein helped him to become a music student at the newly opened conservatory in St. Petersburg. He learned to play the flute and the organ as well as the piano and learning all about composition. In 1866 he moved to Moscow where Nikolai Rubinstein , the brother of Anton, encouraged him to write music with a Russian character. He worked very hard, and was often exhausted, but he managed to finish his First Symphony, which was performed in 1868.


Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Tschaikowsky - Radio-Sinfonie-Orchester Frankfurt - Sinfonische Werke Fatum / Das Gewitter / Der Wojewode / Der SturmPyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Tschaikowsky - Radio-Sinfonie-Orchester Frankfurt - Sinfonische Werke Fatum / Das Gewitter / Der Wojewode / Der SturmPyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Tschaikowsky - Radio-Sinfonie-Orchester Frankfurt - Sinfonische Werke Fatum / Das Gewitter / Der Wojewode / Der SturmPyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Tschaikowsky - Radio-Sinfonie-Orchester Frankfurt - Sinfonische Werke Fatum / Das Gewitter / Der Wojewode / Der Sturm

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